Papa con Huevo Enchiladas

I wasn’t sure whether I wanted red or green salsa for these enchiladas, so I made both. the family sampled both kinds and decided they preferred the red ones. But since both are quite tasty, I’ve included both salsa options and photos.

Papa Enchiladas - Red                                                                                                                            Serves 6
2 large potatoes, peeled and cubed
Oil for frying and dipping
6 large eggs
Salt and pepper to taste
12 corn tortillas
4 oz. grated monterrey jack cheese
1½-2 c. Salsa Verde or Red Chile Salsa

Fry potatoes in oil until golden brown*; beat eggs and add in. Add salt and pepper and scramble well. Dip each tortilla in oil to soften and then in hot salsa. Place in baking dish, stuff with a heaping spoonful of egg mixture and a spoonful of cheese and roll. Cover enchiladas with remaining sauce and top with grated cheese. Heat 15 minutes in 350-degree oven to melt cheese. Serve with a dollop of sour cream.

*If softer potatoes are preferred, microwave the cubed potatoes for 5 minutes before frying.

Salsa Verde

Papa Enchiladas - Green2 medium bell peppers, chunked
3 (13 oz.) cans tomatillos, drained (or 2½ lbs. fresh tomatillos)
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
½ t. cilantro
1 t. salt

If using fresh tomatillos, stew in covered saucepan with 1 cup water until soft. Combine all ingredients in blender and puree. Pour into saucepan, cover and simmer 30-40 minutes.

Red Chile Salsa

5 T. powdered chile ancho (or chili powder)
3 c. water
2 t. salt
1 T. shortening
1½ t. olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 T. flour

Combine chile powder and water and let sit for at least an hour.

In large saucepan, heat shortening and oil over low heat. Grind garlic in molcajete and add to saucepan. Add flour and brown lightly. Add in chile mixture, stirring constantly, until thickened.

Michelada

MicheladaOkay, back when the original cookbook was written, we had never heard of a Michelada. However, since they are so tasty and we have come to love them, we’re adding them to the beverage section.

2 oz. Bloody Mary mix, spicy if you like
6 oz. Mexican Pilsner^ beer*
Lime juice

To us, simple methods are best: Put ice in a tall glass, pour in the mix and beer, squeeze a lime wedge and then drop it into the glass. Stir and enjoy.

But there are also other options. Mixes such as those in the photo can be used instead of or in addition to the Bloody Mary mix. I tend to add the lime one if I don’t have fresh limes. People also add just the lime mix to the pilsner and call that a Chelada.

Options for garnish, if desired:
–two pickled jalapeño slices*
–salted rim
–chile powdered rim
–lime wedge

*The basic Bloody Mary mix/beer/jalapeño recipe is from Cooking Light magazine.

^We opt for Modelo Especial.

Bean Dips

Bean dip (sour cream)Sour Cream Bean Dip (pictured)

2 c. cooked pinto beans and enough juice to blend
1 t. chili powder
1 T. commercial hot sauce
3 T. minced onion
Salt to taste
1/3 c. sour cream

Combine all ingredients except sour cream in blender and blend smooth. Stir in sour cream and mix well. Serve well chilled.

Miguel’s Bean Dip

3 c. cooked pinto beans and enough juice to blend
1 T. garlic powder
2 T. chopped jalapeño pepper
1 T. chile ancho (or substitute 1 T. chili powder)

Soak a small chile ancho in boiled water in covered saucepan until rehydrated. Grind coarsely in molcajete. Combine 1 T. of the chile and remaining ingredients in blender and blend smooth.

Barbecue Bean Dip

2 c. cooked pinto beans and enough juice to blend
1 T. steak sauce (A-1 preferred)
2 pickled jalapeños, quartered
1 medium onion, chopped
8 oz. grated cheddar cheese

Combine all ingredients except cheese in blender and blend smooth. Put bean mixture and cheese in top of double boiler and cook, stirring constantly, until cheese melts. Serve warm or cool.

Rattlesnake Steak

Infographic by Stephen Wildish from The Friday Project

Infographic by Stephen Wildish from The Friday Project

Serves 4
2 lbs. rattlesnake meat*
Salt and pepper to taste
3 t. chile ancho powder
¾ c. flour
½ c. oil

Cut meat into 1-inch thick pieces. Mix salt, pepper, chile and flour. Coat meat with flour mixture and fry in hot oil in skillet until browned, about 10 minutes.

*To prepare the snake, cut off its head and let the body drain. Skin as though removing a glove. Slit snake lengthwise and discard the entrails. Rinse under cold water and pat dry.

Don’t worry, it tastes just like chicken!

Molé

MoleMolé is a meat-stretching dish which has a legend to go with it. The legend we grew up with is:

In colonial Mexico, a convent was told on very short notice that it would receive a visit from the bishop. Knowing that he would be hungry upon arrival, the nuns looked at their one chicken and meager supplies and tried to figure out how to feed everyone. Using what they had on hand, they came up with molé. The ingredients may be varied to suit individual taste.

Serves 10-12

5 dried ancho chiles*
5 dried pasilla chiles
5 dried mulato chiles
5 lb. chicken or turkey parts
1 ½ t. whole comino
2 cloves garlic
6 peppercorns
1 (28 oz.) can whole tomatoes in puree
½ c. roasted, unsalted peanuts
½ c. blanched almonds
½ c. raw pumpkin seeds
5 cloves garlic
2 medium onions, chopped
1 ¾ c. water chiles were soaked in
½ t. cloves
½ t. cinnamon
½ t. cilantro seeds
2 sprigs fresh cilantro or parsley
2 slices toast or 2 flour tortillas
½ c. oil or lard
3 c. chicken or turkey broth
7 oz. Mexican chocolate (or bitter chocolate)
¼ – 1/3 c. sugar
Salt and pepper to taste

Boil water; put in large saucepan and add chiles. Cover and soak for an hour. Combine chicken or turkey, comino, garlic and peppercorns in a large pot. Cover with water and boil 30-45 minutes (an hour for turkey). Remove meat from stock, and if using turkey, remove from bones. Set meat and stock aside. (The cooked meat may be browned in a little oil or lard, if desired.)

Remove seeds and stems from chiles. In blender, combine chiles, tomatoes, nuts, garlic, onions, water, spices, cilantro and toast and blend well. This may have to be done in batches. Pour blended mixture into large pot; add oil and cook, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. Add broth, chocolate (if using bitter chocolate, increase sugar amount), sugar, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat until chocolate is melted and sauce is quite thick. Add poultry and cook over low heat until poultry is heated through.

*Molé may also be made with all ancho chiles or all pasilla chiles, if desired.

A Note on Commercial Molé

If you like the taste of molé but not the trouble of making it, commercial molé is available in either powder or paste form. To mix these for use, either method below will provide good results:

1. Add chicken or turkey broth, sugar* and salt to taste, or
2. Add hot water and smooth peanut butter (and sugar if desired) until molé
is a nice thick consistency.

Add in cooked chicken, turkey or pork and heat through.

* Sugar helps take out the picante sting.

Chile Pequin Doves

Chile pequin

Chile pequin

Serves 2-3
6 doves
Salt and pepper to taste
12 chile pequin
6 slices bacon
½ c. hot water

Sprinkle doves with salt and pepper and put 2 chiles inside each body cavity. Wrap a slice of bacon around each dove’s breast. Arrange birds in shallow baking dish, and add water. Bake covered in 350-degree oven for 1½ hours. Uncover and brown 20-30 minutes longer.

Asado de Puerco

41bfkZhFppL._SX300_Asado de PuercoServes 5-6
1 T. oil
2 lbs. pork shoulder, cubed
½ c. cornmeal or flour
1 c. water or broth
Salt to taste
¼ t. oregano
1 small bay leaf
1 T. Spice Mix

In dutch oven, heat oil and brown meat. Add cornmeal or flour and stir well. Add in water and bring to a boil. Add remaining ingredients and simmer 20 minutes.

Spice Mix

Makes ¾ cup

2 T. chili powder
2 T. chile ancho powder
2 T. chile pasilla powder
3½ t. garlic powder
1 T. comino, ground in molcajete
1 T. freshly ground black pepper
1 T. meat tenderizer

Mix well. Stir in tightly covered jar. Use on meats and poultry.

Chorizo*

Serves 6
1 lb. ground pork
1 lb. ground beef
2 t. comino
1 t. peppercorns
1 T. vinegar
1½ t. oregano
Heaping t. garlic powder
6½ t. chili powder
¼ c. vinegar

Place meat in large mixing bowl. Grind comino and peppercorns in molcajete. Add 1 T. vinegar to loosen spices and add to meat. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. It is best to refrigerate the chorizo overnight in the refrigerator, but not mandatory.

In large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat until well browned.

*Chorizo is not usually eaten as a separate dish because it tends to be a bit greasy unless mixed with something else such as beans (whole or refried), potatoes or scrambled with eggs.

Chorizo Mexicano

3 lbs. pork, cubed
12 chiles anchos, seeds and stems removed
1 T. peppercorns
2 t. comino
2 cloves garlic
2 T. salt
1 c. vinegar

Place meat in large mixing bowl. Soak chiles in boiled water to cover for 10 minutes to soften. Drain well. Grind chiles, peppercorns, comino and garlic in molcajete. Mix with meat, add salt and vinegar and mix well with your hands. Allow to stand 24 hours in refrigerator.

In large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat until well browned.

Beef Chorizo

Serves 2-4
1 lb. ground beef
1 t. comino
½ t. peppercorns
1½ t. vinegar
¾ t. oregano
Heaping ½ t. garlic powder
3 ¼ t. chili powder
1/8 c. vinegar

Place meat in large mixing bowl. Grind comino and peppercorns in molcajete. Add 1½ t. vinegar to loosen spices and add to meat. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. It is best to refrigerate the chorizo overnight in the refrigerator, but not mandatory.

In large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat until well browned.

Frijoles, Frijoles, and More Frijoles

FrijolesHere are a number of pinto bean recipes, with or without pork. One of them is bound to become your favorite.

Frijoles

1 lb. pinto beans
¼ lb. salt pork (1 piece)
3 cloves garlic
Salt to taste

Remove any stones or debris from dry beans. Soak beans in cold water at least 2 hours (overnight is preferred). Rinse in cold water, then refill pot with water to cover beans. Add all ingredients to the pot and bring to a boil. Cover, lower heat and simmer, adding hot water as needed during cooking. Cooking time will vary with length of time beans were soaked; 3 hours is average. Or, to speed cooking, cook partially covered over high heat, adding boiling water as needed. Never allow water level to fall below top of beans.

Frijoles II (pictured)

1 lb. pinto beans
2 t. comino
2 ancho chiles (or 2 T. chili powder)
3 cloves garlic
2¼ T. oil
Salt to taste
1/3 c. chopped onion

Remove any stones or debris from dry beans. Soak beans in cold water at least 2 hours (overnight is preferred). Rinse in cold water, then refill pot with water to cover beans. Grind comino in molcajete and add to beans. Soak chile ancho in hot water in covered saucepan until soft, about 30 minutes. Discard seeds and stem and grind pulp in molcajete; add a little of the hot water to loosen (if using chili powder, eliminate the 2 T. water). Add chile and remaining ingredients to the pot and bring to a boil.

Cover, lower heat and simmer, adding hot water as needed during cooking. Cooking time will vary with length of time beans were soaked; 3 hours is average. Or, to speed cooking, cook partially covered over high heat, adding boiling water as needed. Never allow water level to fall below top of beans.

Frijoles Borrachos

1 lb. pinto beans
¼ lb. salt pork (1 piece)
3 cloves garlic
Salt to taste
1-2 cans warm beer, to taste

Remove any stones or debris from dry beans. Soak beans in cold water at least 2 hours (overnight is preferred). Rinse in cold water, then refill pot with water to cover beans. Add all ingredients to the pot and bring to a boil. Cover, lower heat and simmer, adding hot water as needed during cooking. Cooking time will vary with length of time beans were soaked; 3 hours is average. Or, to speed cooking, cook partially covered over high heat, adding boiling water as needed. Never allow water level to fall below top of beans. During the last 10-15 minutes of cooking time, add beer and heat through.

Frijoles a la Charra

1 lb. pinto beans
¼ lb. salt pork (1 piece)
3 cloves garlic
3 serrano or jalapeño chiles, sliced
Salt to taste
Sliced raw onion
Fresh cilantro

Remove any stones or debris from dry beans. Soak beans in cold water at least 2 hours (overnight is preferred). Rinse in cold water, then refill pot with water to cover beans. Add all ingredients except onion and cilantro to the pot and bring to a boil. Cover, lower heat and simmer, adding hot water as needed during cooking. Cooking time will vary with length of time beans were soaked; 3 hours is average. Or, to speed cooking, cook partially covered over high heat, adding boiling water as needed. Never allow water level to fall below top of beans. Serve topped with onion and cilantro.

Frijoles III

Serves 8
3 c. pinto beans
2-3 cloves garlic
2 thick slices of salt pork
2 T. lard or shortening
1-2 T. salt
1/3 – ½ c. flour
1/3 c. lard or shortening

Remove any stones or debris from dry beans. Soak beans in cold water at least 2 hours (overnight is preferred). Rinse in cold water, then refill pot with water to cover beans. Add garlic and salt pork to the pot and bring to a boil. When beans begin to change color, add 2 T. lard and salt.

Cover, lower heat and simmer, adding hot water as needed during cooking. Cooking time will vary with length of time beans were soaked; 3 hours is average. Or, to speed cooking, cook partially covered over high heat, adding boiling water as needed. Never allow water level to fall below top of beans.

Remove garlic and salt pork. In small saucepan melt 1/3 c. lard and stir in flour to make a sauce. Cook until light brown, approximately 2-3 minutes. Add some of the beans and liquid to pan and stir together. Add back into beans and mash lightly to thicken a bit.

Frijoles RefritosFrijoles refritos

For refried beans, mash cooked pinto beans with a little bit of their juice, either by hand or in the blender. Heat oil in a skillet and add the beans, frying and stirring until they resemble paste.